Created Whole Tortillas Video

Leave a comment

Tortilla Factory Updates

Leave a comment

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Here are more up-to-date pictures from the work being done on the factory.

We recently purchased a dough divider that is being shipped from Connecticut. We hope to move the tortilla machine into the space within the next couple of weeks. The goal was to have production going by now, so that Nature’s Food Market & Juice Bar would be able to make their Raw Pumpkin Cheesecakes for Thanksgiving. But, if you contact Wendy at the Market, you may be able to place a special order.

Tim (Created Whole) and Chuck (Nature’s Food Market) have been hard at work everyday getting the place up to health code. If you refer back to a few blog posts ago, you will see what the space looked like a month ago.

In a few weeks we will post before and after pictures.

Our dream is happening!

Fix The World

Leave a comment

Dr. Steve with the kids in Haiti

If you read the December 2011 issue of Outside Magazine, you will find a feature entitled, “The Outside Guide To Fixing The World.”  Outside made their pick of the 30 best- smartly managed groups and charitable organizations with transparent financials, efficient spending, and track record of on-the-ground success.

I’ve recently been thinking a lot about what organizations we, at Created Whole can support and be part of.  I believe that businesses must not only exist to earn a profit, but also to reach humanity.  Companies must make a conscious and determined effort to give back to the world.

Last year, I read the book, Half The Sky, a book that candidly addresses women’s issues in the world,  namely three major abuses: sex trafficking and forced prostitution; gender-based violence including honor killings and mass rape, and maternal mortality, which needlessly claims one woman a minute.  The tragedies are terrible, but solutions to these problems can be found, not by changing entire communities and livelihoods, but simply through educating women, among other things.

Because I have an entrepreneurial spirit, one story that has remained with me centers around the concept of microlending.  Microlending is the supply of loans, savings, and other basic financial services to the poor (http://cgap.org).  In developing countries, microlending allows women to start businesses through small loans that they are able to pay back over time.  This allows them the possibility of being financially independent, to build confidence in themselves, and to earn respect from their husbands and village.

One of the organizations Outside Magazine recommends is Kiva, a San Francisco based non-profit, that since 2005, has provided $248 million in microloans to small entrepreneurs in developing countries.  When on a trip to East Africa 2004, Matt Flannery, a former software engineer at TiVo, saw how much difference small investments can make, and realized he needed to help.  He launched Kiva, and currently the organization is now working to start microfinancing programs in the U.S., beginning with Detroit and New Orleans.

There are hundreds of ways that you can give back and help those around you. Some ways will speak to your soul and tug at your heart.  You may find you love children or you want to help bring fresh water to a village in Africa.  Find where you fit and step out and make a difference.

If you are interested in projects like Half The Sky, check out Orange County based International Princess Project, empowering women formerly enslaved in prostitution, to repair broken lives and restore their sense of self through providing vocational training and dignified work for women.

International Princess Project:  http://www.intlprincess.org/

ADRA, which stands for Adventist Development & Relief Agency, seeks to identify and address social injustice and deprivation in developing countries.  You can visit ADRAs Gift Catalog and personally choose what you would like to give to, whether it be sponsoring a child’s education or feeding a family for a month.

Here is the list from Outside Magazine of non-profit organizations. Also, check in your area for local non-profits.  Either way, constantly be looking for ways to improve your immediate world.  One small act, done consistently, with the combined effort of others, does a lot to create a better place for everyone to live.

December 2011:  Outside’s List of Non-Profits

Shelterbox: Practical tools for disaster victims. Shelterbox.Org

American Himalayan Foundation: Provides resources for education, health care, and cultural preservation in Nepal, Tibet, and Tibetan refugee settlements in India. Himalayan-Foundation.Org

Oceana: Conducts studies and research, inform lawmakers, and protect degraded oceans through concrete policy. Oceana.Org

Macro Sea. Turns “junk spaces” into inspired community rec centers and art projects. Macro-Sea.com

Adaptive Action Sports: Gives disabled athletes a path to extreme activities. ADACS.Org
KIVA: Micro lending in developing countries.  KIVA.Org

1% For The Planet. Businesses pledging to give 1% of sales to vetted environmental groups. OnePercentForThePlanet.Org

Big City Mountaineers: Gives underprivileged city kids a chance to experience wilderness adventure.  Mountaineers.Org

Waves For Water: Recruits surfers to deliver water filters in their travels through developing countries. WavesForWater.Org

African Wildlife Foundation: Includes local people in conservation activism. AWF.Org

American Forests: Establish and protect state and national forests. AmericanForests.Org

World Bicycle Relief: Distributes and sells bikes in developing countries. BicycleRelief.Org

Water For People: Helps those in developing countries gain access to clean water. WaterForPeople.Org

Climate Counts: Scores corporations on their carbon footprint. ClimateCounts.Org

Arch Angel Ancient Tree Archive: Mission is to clean up the planet’s air and water and reverse the effects of climate change by cloning the world’s biggest and oldest trees. AncientTreeArchive.Org

Citizen Effect: Online fundraising platform that connects citizen philanthropists with vetted, small-scale projects around the world. CitizenEffect.Org

IOBY: Posts local environmental projects in NYC like urban farm start-ups. IOBY.Org

American Trails: dedicated to building, expanding, and safeguarding trail systems. AmericanTrails.Org

The Marine Mammal Center: Rescues sea mammals. MarineMammalCenter.Org

Afghan Child Education and Care Organization: creates safe homes for Afghani orphans. AFCECO.Org

Foundation Rwanda: Pays for education, medical, and other care for mothers and children of sexual assaults in Rwanda. FoundationRwanda.Org

Environmental Defense Fund:  devises solutions for environmental issues.  EDF.Org

Trekking For Kids:  Raises money for orphans by organized walkathon-style treks.  TrekkingForKids.Org

American Rivers:  Healing America’s waterways.  AmericanRivers.Org

Health In Harmony:  Better healthcare for Indonesian Indonesian farmers can improve the health of the forest. HealthInHarmony.Org

Pathfinder International:  Expands access to basic health and reproductive services so individuals in developing nations can plan families and build sustainable communities.  Pathfind.Org

Rainforest Alliance:  Aims to preserve the biodiversity of forests worldwide.  RainforestAlliance.Org

TechnoServe:  Connects entrepreneurs in developing countries with capital and educational resources. TechnoServe.Org

Vital Voices Global Partnership:  Combats human trafficking, supporting women entrepreneurs, and advancing women in politics and public leadership.  VitalVoices.Org

Website Front Page Photo

Leave a comment

This is an option for our front page of our website. What do you think?

What Does “Going Green” Mean?

Leave a comment

Even though Created Whole has been producing tortillas for over two years, with the opening of our new factory, it’s as if we are starting at day one.  With a clean slate, there are a lot of aspects of the business that we need to take into consideration, one of those being creating a “Green” company

The term green is often thrown around, but what does “Going Green” mean?

According to Kaplan, who has written the book Greening Your Small Business, “going green is the implementation of a broad range of policies and procedures focused on conserving and improving the natural environment, both for its own sake as well as to improve business strength and sustainability” (12).

Going green involves adopting a set of guiding principles related to sustainability and implementing practices that support those principles throughout your business.  When it comes to sustainability, there are three elements that are involved:  environmental, economic, and social (Kaplan, 13).

The book offers guidelines and ways to help small businesses go green, emphasizing that companies need to focus initially on aspects of the organization that are already green, while continuing to implement further reaching strategies.

The book outlines 8 key steps to going green, and they are the following:

  1. Commit
  2. Define goals and objectives
  3. Assess your greenness
  4. Assess your risks
  5. Assess your opportunities
  6. Create a Plan
  7. Implement your plan
  8. Communicate

For more resources on the subject of sustainability and going green, please visit EnergySTAR.

Cited

Kaplan, Jennifer. Greening Your Small Business:  How To Improvce Your Bottom Line. 1st Ed. 2009

The Story of June

Leave a comment

It’s August, a month for summer to say goodbye, but still, Bakersfield greets you with a desert dry heat and a sun that tricks you to believe that your sticky skin is bronzing into a tan.  No. Sorry. A sun this hot says a hello with no bronze, only burn.

I’d forgotten the Bakersfield summers of all engulfing heat.  Living at the beach makes for endless, mild summers that flow so seamlessly, one never knows where Summer begins or ends.  I lose track of my days and weeks, thinking Tuesday is Saturday, and not realizing that I do have responsibilities besides riding my bike and walking along the beach.  Not realizing that it’s no longer June.

June was when we planned on starting out as a vendor at the SLO Market Nights, a crowded, shoulder-to-shoulder street fair and farmer’s market that happens every Thursday night, in San Luis Obispo, California.  Preceding June’s entrance, May was when we  hoped to be in our tortilla factory space.  Who knows what April gifted us with, but apparently not anything memorable.  March, greeted us with the purchase of a tortilla machine.

That was five months ago.  So why is there no factory ready?  Where is that agreement with Whole Foods and The Veggie Grill?  What is taking so long?

That, I don’t know.

Five months of waiting.  Waiting with frustration, and a deteriorating mood due to the fact that I don’t even have tortillas to eat (It’s been three months since I’ve eaten a tortilla. This shouldn’t be happening!!!  My dad owns the company!!!).  Wondering what to do to help.  Feeling like there isn’t even a business to call a business.

Today, I saw it again.  I saw the dream, I felt the excitement of progress.  There are other people dreaming with Created Whole and just as excited, if not more, to see us succeed.  Sometimes things happen slower than we think they should, but “shoulds” are rules without relevance.

This is happening.  Seeing the developments made me realize the gravity of how small we are, how much we have to work, and how fast this will grow.  Get ready, there’s a lot of work ahead.

Here are some pictures of the building where we will have our new Tortilla home!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Never Say Never

3 Comments

The woman sitting across from Kara stretches her arms wide, as to create emphasis. “Kara,” she says, “Do you realize that, on one hand, you are completely spontaneous, facing what many people fear with excitement and enjoyment, relishing the unplanned adventures, and on the polar opposite end, cling to a suffocating control and structure that has wanted to choke out any and all of the beauty in life that you so desperately are searching?”

That would be a quite accurate observation.

Kara is an anomaly, not following the normal post-college life that many of her friends have chosen with marriages, homes, kids, and office jobs. “I thought I wanted all of that right out of college, but really, I had no idea. In God’s wisdom, I didn’t get what I hoped for, and how I thought my life would be is very, very different from my current reality. I am very blessed and thankful that God knows best and that my plans didn’t happen,” she says.

If you told Kara four years ago that she would be a flight attendant, living in Los Angeles, in a quaint beach apartment, having traveled to Haiti, Costa Rica, Honduras, Belize, Hawaii, British Columbia, Germany, Czech Republic, Amsterdam, Belgium, Guatemala, all in the span of one year, as well as developing a strategy to take a little tortilla company mainstream, she would have looked at you and asked if you were feeling ok…or if you were smoking crack.

She never wanted to be a flight attendant, had no desire to live in LA, and traveling that much seemed too unbelievably awesome. “I remember flying out of LAX as a passenger years ago, taking a red-eye out, noticing the flight attendants, and thinking, ‘I’d hate to do that job.’ It’s crazy for me to think of how I actually love my job, how I like LA, and how lucky I am to have made a great community of friends.”

To Kara, flying is still “just a job,” and her passion, and what she knows to be her future, is Created Whole. Her creativity, enthusiasm, and natural interest in people, combined with a degree in Marketing, have created a natural fit as Lead of Marketing and Promotions. “I believe in our company. I can’t imagine my life without tortillas, and honestly, I don’t know how other people live without them either. They shouldn’t have to. My personal mission is that people no longer be without an awesome tasting whole wheat tortilla,” she says with a laugh.

In Kara’s “fun time”, she enjoys riding her Cannondale road-bike, spending time with friends, and dreaming up the next adventure. The “Must-See List” includes Italy, Chile, Israel, and Thailand, and the chart toppers for the “Must-Do List” are learning Spanish, sky-diving, and biking from Canada to Mexico.

Older Entries